A Small Challenge with NAS Gateways

SAN Volume Controller

Late in 2010, Netapp quietly announced they were not planning to support V Series (and by extension IBM N Series NAS Gateways) to be used with any recent version of IBM’s SAN Volume Controller.

This was discussed more fully on the Netapp communities forum (you’ll need to create a login) and the reason given was insufficient sales revenue to justify on-going support.

This is to some extent generically true for all N Series NAS gateways. For example, if all you need is basic CIFS access to your disk storage, most of the spend still goes on the disk and the SVC licensing, not on the N Series gateway. This is partly a result of the way Netapp prices their systems – the package of the head units and base software (including the first protocol) is relatively cheap, while the drives and optional software features are relatively expensive.

Netapp however did not withdraw support for V Series NAS gateways on XIV or DS8000, and nor do they seem to have any intention to, as best I can tell, considering that support to be core capability for V Series NAS Gateways.

I also note that Netapp occasionally tries to position V Series gateways as a kind of SVC-lite, to virtualize other disk systems for block I/O access.

Anyway, it was interesting that what IBM announced was a little different to what Netapp announced “NetApp & N Series Gateway support is available with SVC 6.2.x for selected configurations via RPQ [case-by-case lab approval] only

Storwize V7000

What made this all a bit trickier was IBM’s announcement of the Storwize V7000 as its new premier midrange disk system.

Soon after on the Netapp communities forum it was stated that there was a “joint decision” between Netapp and IBM that there would be no V Series NAS gateway support and no PVRs [Netapp one-off lab support] for Storwize V7000 either.

Now the Storwize V7000 disk system, which is projected to have sold close to 5,000 systems in its first 12 months, shares the same code-base and features as SVC (including the ability to virtualize other disk systems). So think about that for a moment, that’s two products and only one set of testing and interface support – that sounds like the support ROI just improved, so maybe you’d think that the original ROI objection might have faded away at this point? It appears not.

Anyway, once again, what IBM announced was a little different to the Netapp statement “NetApp & N Series Gateway support is available with IBM Storwize V7000 6.2.x for selected configurations via RPQ only“.

Whither from here?

The good news is that IBM’s SONAS gateways support XIV and SVC (and other storage behind SVC) and SONAS delivers some great features that N Series doesn’t have (such as file-based ILM to disk or tape tiers) so SVC is pretty well catered for when it comes to NAS gateway funtionality.

When it comes to Storwize V7000 the solution is a bit trickier. SONAS is a scale-out system designed to cater for 100’s of TBs up to 14 PBs. That’s not an ideal fit for the midrange Storwize V7000 market. So the Netapp gateway/V-series announcement has created potential difficulties for IBM’s midrange NAS gateway portfolio… hence the title of this blog post.

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2 Responses

  1. […] relatively cheap, while the drives and optional software features are relatively expensive. Read on here LD_AddCustomAttr("AdOpt", "1"); LD_AddCustomAttr("Origin", "other"); […]

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  2. I wonder if IBM will be offering something to bridge this gap in the future. The N Series GW was a great way to replace the sprawling windows file servers and utilize your SVC storage pool, so you didn’t have storage islands all over the place. Very unfortunate that this was dropped. Considering they are still supporting the XIV and DS8000 this seems more a political decision instead of a technical one.

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